• 'Circle of Life' steel and hand-fused glass sculpture by Shirley Erickson. Part of the permanent collection.
  • 'Cascade Evening' basalt sculpture by Reg Akright. Part of the permanent collection.
  • 'Clarity' steel and glass sculpture by Merilee Moore. Part of the permanent collection.
  • 'Genesis III' limestone, granite and wood sculpture by Brian Berman. Part of the rotating collection.
  • 'Stone Vessels' granite sculpture by Verena Schwippert. Part of the rotating collection.
  • The Arboretum’s signature entrance columns by Little and Lewis, topped with an arbor by Rex Lukinich
  • 'Rambler' bronze sculpture by Jeff Day
  • Roundness of the Horizon: The Fossil, granite, by Katzutaka Uchida
  • 'Fibonacci' by Pam Hom
  • 'Love at First Sight' by Hank Nelson
  • 'Enzo Moon' by Daniel Michael
  • A lovely, glazed red pot in the Exotics garden of the Perennial border is surrounded by New Zealand flax (Phormium cookianum), Japanese Forest grass (Hakonechloa macra) and the bloom of a common artichoke (Cynara scolymus).
  • A tiny dwarf water lily (Nymphaea) on the verge of blooming completes the water feature in the Exotics garden of the Perennial border.
  • Canna lilies seem to over-winter well in the Exotics garden of the Perennial border due to the Arboretum's maritime Zone 8 planting climate.
  • This is known as the 'Corner Pathway garden' in the Perennial border with the Exotics garden in the background. What a lovely sight!
  • Russian Sage in the Perennial border.
  • Joe Ryeweed (Eupatorium) in the Perennial border.
  • Wonderful spring color from tulips in the Perennial border
  • Wonderful spring color from tulips in the Perennial border
  • Wonderful spring color from tulips in the Perennial border
  • Follow the path to the top of the Viewing Mound and discover the metal water feature 'Fibonacci' by Pam Hom
  • This sculpture was inspired by the discoveries of proportionate geometry found in nature.
  • Enjoy moments of meditation with the soothing sound of flowing water.
  • Catch a sweeping view of the Arboretum grounds from the top of the Viewing Mound toward paths through the Japanese Maple Garden.
  • The view from the top continues to the Pavilion beyond the Northwest Native Trail where visitors often gather.
  • Shaded rock stairs planted with a variety of Hostas connect the Viewing Mound to the Northwest Native Trail at the bottom.
  • A basalt column at the entrance to the Northwest Demonstration garden does double duty as a birdbath and a vase for a lace-cap hydrangea blossom.
  • Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia fulgida) form a backdrop to annuals along a path in the Northwest Demonstration garden.
  • Pink astilbes provide a splash of color in a shady border in the Northwest Demonstration garden.
  • Rugosa Roses spell Summer in the Northwest Demonstration garden.
  • Early spring catkins on Harry Lauder's Walking Stick, a contorted filbert.
  • Early winter color on Witch Hazel 'Primavera'
  • Clouds of blooms cover Golden Raindrops Flowering Crabapple in spring, followed by golden apples in the fall.
  • Believe it or not, there is a palm hardy enough for our Northwest winters - The Windmill Palm, seen here beside the pathway.
  • Highlighted by sunlight Acer japonicum (Full Moon Maple) shows off its yellow-green foliage to good advantage.
  • Early Spring is an excellent time to view the color in our Japanese Maple grove, where thirteen different varieties of these spectacular trees strut their stuff.
  • A particularly fine specimen of Acer palmatum 'Villa Taranto' shows it's finely cut leaves in the Spring. A delicate small tree excellent for a small garden.
  • The pale orange leaves of Acer palmatum 'Maho' in the Spring are very unusual and the small stature of this specimen makes it a great candidate for a container.
  • A fine view of the Japanese Maple grove as you cross the bridge over the dry stream bed from the Woodland Garden.
  • This beautiful example of the Japanese Maple (Osakazuki) is one of two magnificent mature specimens in the Japanese Maple grove.
  • Outstanding example of one of our maples.
  • Acer Palmatum 'Shin-desojo' is a good choice for a pot.
  • A well pruned example of a green dissectum Japanese Maple in the Maple grove.
  • Looking from the edge of the Woodland garden, across the Japanese Maple Grove and into the Northwest Demonstration garden makes you want to wander down the path you see in front of you.
  • More of the hydrangea.
  • Looking up the trail past the woodlands bridge.
  • The woodlands Grotto.
  • More Grotto.
  • Pieris Japonica Mt. Fire at it's best aflame.
  • Knadhill & Exbury Azaleas in full bloom on Mothers day.
  • Come and see the new Arboretum sculptures.
  • Leucothoe fontanesiana Facinating leaf coloration begins in the fall while fragrant white flowers form in May.
  • Epemedium rubrum Red-edged leaves in the winter followed by small red flowers.
  • Upright form and gold-tinted foliage shown by Golden Hinoki Cypress, Chamaecyparis obtuse 'Gracilis Aurea'. Merrilee Moore's sculpture, 'Clarity' appears in the background.
  • Low, weeping form and blue-tinted foliage shown by Cedrus deodara 'Feeling Blue'
  • Bright gold needles on a compact dwarf white pine, Pinus parviflora 'Goldilocks'
  • Upright weeping form and silvery blue foliage shown by the weeping Siberian spruce, Picea omorika 'Pendula'
  • Spectacular cone structure and silver-backed foliage on the Silver Korean Fir, Abies koriana 'Silbrlocke'
  • Graceful blue weeping form of European Weeping Larch, Larix decidua 'Pendula', a deciduous conifer that loses its needles in winter
  • Sculpture by Shirley Erickson, 'Circle of Life', set among a variety of conifers in the Conifer Garden.
  • One of the first to bloom in late winter is Cornus mas the Cornelian Cherry tree, with bright yellow flowers.
  • The view down a portion of the walk shows Laburnum waterii the Golden Chain Tree with flowers hanging overhead and Magnolia seboldii the Oyama Magnolia blooming in the background.
  • Trees were selected that would not interfere with the existing power lines like the Pagoda Dogwood show here in full flower.
  • Trees were selected for interesting features like Acer griseum the Paper Bark Maple with its peeling bark.
  • A tree selected for its interesting leaf color, Cercis Canadensis the Eastern Redbud variety Forest Pansy, has burgundy colored leaves from spring to fall.
  • This delicate fringe of white flowers shows how Chionanthus virginicus the Fringe Tree got its name.
  • Koelreuteria paniculata, the Golden Rain Tree, is native to China and Korea, but is a very popular ornamental tree in this area. It creates quite a focal point in the landscape with its yellow summer blossoms and hanging pods in October. The full majesty of its bloom is achieved in full sun, but it will tolerate some shade. At 30’-35’ tall it is still considered a medium sized tree. Over time, its width will grow to 30’. This tree is part of the Urban Tree Walk Collection on the west side of the parking lot.
  • Fall provides us with a show of color along the tree walk. Shown here in late fall is Oxydendrum arboreum the Sourwood Tree.
  • Many hours of volunteer effort go into maintaining the Small Urban Tree Walk
  • A view of the Perennial border; part of the Scent garden and formal White garden with its white garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) and Asian lilies. Golden rod (Solidago) in the foreground adds a wonderful contrast.
  • With white garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) and Asian lilies creating height; white sage (Salvia) and dwarf barberry (Berberis thunbergii) in the foreground, the Scent garden is a sight to behold (and smell to inhale!).
  • Giant hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) in the Scent garden blooms all summer long attracting bees....as well as people.
  • Lace-cap hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla) spill out from behind a tree into a patch of sun in the Woodland garden.
  • A view of the Perennial border; part of the Scent garden and formal White garden with its white garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) and Asian lilies. Golden rod (Solidago) in the foreground adds a wonderful contrast.
  • Northwest Native Plant Trail: be sure to notice the images of leaves and animal tracks in the paved pathway
  • Blue Camass flower; bulbs of this plant were an important part of Native American diet
  • Western Columbine, a favorite of hummingbirds
  • Native Iris
  • Stonecrop, found on rocky cliffs and outcrops throughout the region
  • A glimpse of spring flowering Iris, Stonecrop and Goat’s Beard
  • Garrya elliptica, or Silk Tassel shrub, an uncommon northwest native evergreen shrub.
  • L-R Penstemon Confertus, Uncarvillea mairei, Antirrhinum sempervirens
  • Anacyclus depressus “Mt. Atlas Daisy”
  • Gentiana pumila
  • Dodecatheon Hendersonii
  • Leontopodium “Mt. Everest”
  • Shrub – Daphne “Lawrence Crocker”
  • Shrub – Leiophylum buxifolium
  • Dwarf conifer- Abies procera “Blaue Hexe”
  • A 900 square foot rock garden featuring alpine perennials, bulbs, dwarf shrubs and dwarf conifers installed at the bottom on the Viewing Mound.
  • Rain garden functioning to capture and filter water runoff from structures and pavement
  • Rain garden plantings in higher areas that do not remain wet.
  • Mayor Ray Stephanson (center) and Arboretum volunteers planting the 50th Anniversary Pin Oak to begin implementing the South Arboretum Plan
  • Planting a Pin Oak Tree in April 2013 to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Arboretum.
 

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